List

Lucretius

Titus Lucretius Carus was a Roman poet and philosopher. His only known work is the philosophical poem De rerum natura, a didactic work about the tenets and philosophy of Epicureanism, and which usually is translated into English as On the Nature of Things—and somewhat less often as On the Nature of the Universe.

7 Notes

99 BC - 55 BC

Rome, Italy

Compared to him. I believe the comparison to be, in fact, unequal, but I find it difficult to confirm myself in my belief when I am caught up by one of Lucretius's fine passages.

Michael Montaigne

Discuss

Seneca(4 BC - 65 AD)

Surely it is not in doubt that that by which something can be touched is a body? ‘For nothing can touch or be touched except a body’, as Lucretius says.¹ But all those things which I have mentioned would not alter the body unless they touched it. Therefore, they are bodies.

Seneca pdf p.57

#Quotes

Michel de Montaigne(1533 – 1592)

Compared to him. I believe the comparison to be, in fact, unequal, but I find it difficult to confirm myself in my belief when I am caught up by one of Lucretius's fine passages.

Book & Page: Saint Augustin Confessions pdf p.33

#Praise

There is nothing single and rare from nature's point of view, but only from the point of view of our knowledge, which is a poor foundation for the rules we make, and which is apt to give us a very false picture of things. Just as today we vainly infer the decline and decrepitude of the world from arguments based on our own weakness and decay,'So now our age is affected, and the earth with it. So, just as vainly, did Lucretius conclude its recent birth and youth from the vigor that he saw in the minds of his day, which were fertile in inventions and novelties in all the arts.

Michael Montaigne p.278

#Quotes

Francis Bacon(1561 - 1626)

"Neither shall you see those men which are drenched in this frenzy of mind to breathe almost anything else, or to include even without occasion anything more than speech tending to atheism, as may appear in Lucretius the Epicure, who makes of his invectives against religion as it were a burden or verse of return to all his other discourses"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 96

#Analysis

"Neither is that pleasure of small efficacy and contentment to the mind of man, which the poet Lucretius describes elegantly Sweet sea with great seas with troubled winds"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 171

#Quotes

"The quarrels and division for religion were evils unknown to the heathen: and no marvel, for it is the true God that is the jealous God, and the gods of the heathen were good fellows. But yet the bonds of religion unity are so to be strengthened, as the bonds of human society be not dissolved. Lucretius the poet, when he beheld the act of Agamemnon, enduring and assisting at the sacrifice of his daughter, concludes with this verse: To such ill actions religion could persuade a man’"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 182

#Quotes

"For this is but to dash the first table against the second; and so to consider men as Christian, as we forgot that they are men. Lucretius the poet, when he beheld the act of Agamemnon, that could endure the sacrificing of his own daughter, exclaimed: To such ill actions religion could persuade a man ‘"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 182

#Quotes

Seneca(4 BC - 65 AD)

Surely it is not in doubt that that by which something can be touched is a body? ‘For nothing can touch or be touched except a body’, as Lucretius says.¹ But all those things which I have mentioned would not alter the body unless they touched it. Therefore, they are bodies.

Seneca pdf p.57

#Quotes

Michel de Montaigne(1533 – 1592)

There is nothing single and rare from nature's point of view, but only from the point of view of our knowledge, which is a poor foundation for the rules we make, and which is apt to give us a very false picture of things. Just as today we vainly infer the decline and decrepitude of the world from arguments based on our own weakness and decay,'So now our age is affected, and the earth with it. So, just as vainly, did Lucretius conclude its recent birth and youth from the vigor that he saw in the minds of his day, which were fertile in inventions and novelties in all the arts.

Michael Montaigne p.278

#Quotes

Francis Bacon(1561 - 1626)

"Neither is that pleasure of small efficacy and contentment to the mind of man, which the poet Lucretius describes elegantly Sweet sea with great seas with troubled winds"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 171

#Quotes

"The quarrels and division for religion were evils unknown to the heathen: and no marvel, for it is the true God that is the jealous God, and the gods of the heathen were good fellows. But yet the bonds of religion unity are so to be strengthened, as the bonds of human society be not dissolved. Lucretius the poet, when he beheld the act of Agamemnon, enduring and assisting at the sacrifice of his daughter, concludes with this verse: To such ill actions religion could persuade a man’"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 182

#Quotes

"For this is but to dash the first table against the second; and so to consider men as Christian, as we forgot that they are men. Lucretius the poet, when he beheld the act of Agamemnon, that could endure the sacrificing of his own daughter, exclaimed: To such ill actions religion could persuade a man ‘"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 182

#Quotes
No notes yet...
Not notes yet...
No notes yet...
Not notes yet...
No notes yet...
Not notes yet...

Michel de Montaigne(1533 – 1592)

Compared to him. I believe the comparison to be, in fact, unequal, but I find it difficult to confirm myself in my belief when I am caught up by one of Lucretius's fine passages.

Book & Page: Saint Augustin Confessions pdf p.33

#Praise

Francis Bacon(1561 - 1626)

"Neither shall you see those men which are drenched in this frenzy of mind to breathe almost anything else, or to include even without occasion anything more than speech tending to atheism, as may appear in Lucretius the Epicure, who makes of his invectives against religion as it were a burden or verse of return to all his other discourses"

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 96

#Analysis
Back to top