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Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius, born in 121 AD, was a Roman emperor renowned for his stoic philosophy and contributions to the field of philosophy. As the last of the Five Good Emperors, he ruled from 161 to 180 AD and left behind a powerful collection of personal writings known as "Meditations." In these profound reflections, Marcus Aurelius explored themes such as ethics, self-discipline, and the transience of life, offering timeless wisdom and insights into the human condition that continue to resonate with readers across the ages.

1 Notes

121 - 180

Rome, Italy

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Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626)

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus; whereof the latter, who obscured his colleague and survived him long, was named the Philosopher: who as he excelled all the rest in learning, so he excelled them likewise in perfection of all royal virtues; insomuch as Julianus the emperor, in his book entitled Caesares, being as a pasquil or satire to deride all his predecessors, feigned that they were all invited to a banquet of the gods, and Silenus the jester sat at the nether end of the table and bestowed a scoff on every one as they came in  but when Marcus Philosophes came in, Silenus was graveled and out of countenance, not knowing where to carp at on him; save at the last, he gave a glance0 at his patience towards his wife.

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 157

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Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626)

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus; whereof the latter, who obscured his colleague and survived him long, was named the Philosopher: who as he excelled all the rest in learning, so he excelled them likewise in perfection of all royal virtues; insomuch as Julianus the emperor, in his book entitled Caesares, being as a pasquil or satire to deride all his predecessors, feigned that they were all invited to a banquet of the gods, and Silenus the jester sat at the nether end of the table and bestowed a scoff on every one as they came in  but when Marcus Philosophes came in, Silenus was graveled and out of countenance, not knowing where to carp at on him; save at the last, he gave a glance0 at his patience towards his wife.

Book & Page: Francis Bacon Oxford 157

#Analysis
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